Monday, April 9, 2012

Live Plant Imports Major Source of Disease and Pests in US Forests.

 
Balsam woolly adelgids, small wingless insects that infest and kill firs, especially Balsam Fir and Fraser Fir, were introduced from Europe around 1900. They have destroyed roughly 95 percent of the Fraser firs in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, and have had a significant impact on forests in the Pacific Northwest.


UCSB Study Shows Forest Insects and Diseases Arrive in U.S. Via Imported Plants

almost 70 percent of the most damaging non-native forest insects and diseases currently afflicting U.S. forests arrived via imported live plants. 

The study, led by Andrew Liebhold, a Forest Service researcher with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, shows that in the last 43 years, the quantity of plant imports to the U.S. has risen by more than 500 percent, peaking at 3.15 billion plants in 2007. Nearly half of the imported live plants entering the U.S. are destined for either California or Florida.
 
The authors studied 82 high-impact invasive insects and diseases in detail. Of these, 95 percent of sap-feeding insects and 89 percent of foliage-feeding insects probably arrived on live plants. In contrast, roughly 85 percent of wood- and phloem-boring insects likely entered the country on wood packaging materials, logs, lumber, or other wood sources.


Study link:

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